What is the Perfume Project?

This blog is a constantly evolving forum for thoughts on perfume, perfume-making, plants (especially orchids and flora of the Pacific Northwest) and life in general. It started out chronicling the adventures of Olympic Orchids Perfumes, established in July 2010, and has expanded in other directions. A big part of the blog is thinking about the ongoing process of learning and experimentation that leads to new perfumes, the exploration of perfumery materials, the theory and practice of perfume making, the challenges of marketing perfumes and other fragrance products, and random observations on philosophy and society. Spam comments will be marked as such and deleted; any comments that go beyond the boundaries of civil discourse will also be deleted. I am grateful to all of you, the readers, who contribute to the blog by commenting and making this a truly interactive perfume project.

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

WINNER OF COTTONWOOD DRAWING AND A NEW ONE

It’s been way too long and the cottonwood snow is long gone, but finally here is the winner of the drawing:

LORENZO

If you are the winner, please send me an e-mail (olympicorchids at gmail dot com) or a PM on the Olympic Orchids Facebook page.

I will need your full and correct name and shipping address. If I have not heard from you before I post the next drawing, the goodies will go into the jackpot for the next one. 

Now that the academic year is over, I will have time to get back to posting regularly, at least over the summer. 

Last weekend we were east of the Cascades, admiring the meadow full of wild iris flowers in the photo. 

There is a new drawing for 100 g of assorted samples, so leave a comment about your local wildflowers to enter. 

[Photo of Rocky Mountain iris flowers is mine]

18 comments:

  1. Our local wildflowers are quite usually small and easy to miss. I believe the ones I see most often are called blue toadfax. Not as pretty as that iris!

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    1. Parrot, this is the first time that I've seen so many wild iris all together. It was quite spectacular! You are entered in the new drawing.

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  2. Within my urban area, I know of a few hidden wildlife areas where trillium, jack-in-the-pulpit, toad lily and bloodroot grow. Always a pleasure to spot during a walk through the woods.

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    1. Mary, what a great thing to have woods in your urban area! You're entered in the drawing.

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  3. This year has been pretty stellar for wildflowers in my area of Southern Ontario, I live near a forest where there are hundreds of trilliums, and saw a red trillium for the first time in my life! Some beautiful blush pink ones too, among the white.

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    1. Jen, as far as I know we have no trilliums here, but yours sound spectacular. You're entered in the drawing.

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  4. The woods around my house are full of columbine and white violets. The bumblebees have been quite happy.

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  5. Unknown, I love watching the bumblebees, especially the little ones with fuzzy orange butts. You're entered in the drawing.

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  6. We have wisteria growing all over the roadways around our house. You turn a corner and see giant cascades of purple blooms all around the trees and bushes. I'm not sure if wisteria has a scent. I usually see them from a distance.

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    1. Anne, wisteria does have a scent, so it would be worthwhile getting up close and sniffing it. You're in the drawing.

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  7. Here in northern California we have meadowfoam, Western azalea and ginger, wild lilac, flowering currant, and huckleberry.

    I may take a hike to the Sierras where there is a lot of Indian paintbrush.

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  8. Emily, we have a lot of the same things you have in northern California. The mountains are a whole different set of ecosystems. You're entered in the drawing.

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  9. We have a lot of blue wildflowers around here; violets, anemone, wild ginger and some sort of miniature iris. It’s been hot and wet this spring/summer so I think the bloom is almost over.

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    1. Triniti, it sounds like you've got a lot of beautiful wildflowers. Violets grow like weeds here, but the other things not so much. You're in the drawing.

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  10. Our wildflowers include Jacob's darts, forget me nits, goldenrod, and chamomile along the road.

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  11. zzibbyz, we have forget-me-nots, goldenrod (not yet) and chamomile, too. You're in the drawing.

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